History of Zyprexa

Since the beginning of mankind, mental illness has played a role in our society. Victims of such illnesses have been outcast, stereotyped and often ridiculed. However, over time, medical and psychiatric science advanced and the medical community became more knowledgeable of these conditions. It wasnt until the 20th century when scientists began to experiment with certain chemicals that would alleviate symptoms caused by neurological disorders such as schizophrenia. These drugs are called antipsychotics and they block certain chemical receptors in the brain. At first these drugs were praised in the medical community, however case studies began to show that long term effects of these drugs caused patients to develop serious coordination problems. Since the benefits often times outweighed the risks, …

The Fascinating History of Sugar in Europe

You wouldnt believe it if we told you that once upon a time Motril in the Costa Tropical region was considered the sugar capital of the world. Although today, if you visit Motril, you will find nothing more than a pre-industrial sugar museum that talks in pictures about the golden days of the sugarcane industry in Spain. The museum was actually opened in 2004 and is called the Museo Preindustrial de la Caa de Azucar. This museum is one of its kinds and was built on the same site where the remains of the famous La Palma sugar refinery was situated. The La Palma sugar refinery was discovered during an excavation project in progress in 1990. There are several documents …

History of Coffee: Part III – Colonisation of Coffee

By the 17th Century, with the popularity of coffee ever increasing in Europe, the interest of the then World Superpowers – Britain, France, Netherlands, Portugal and Spain – also grew. Up until this point, coffee imported into Europe had come from the Arabian Peninsula, over which none of these nations had any control. The Europeans had sample coffee and liked it, and now they wanted to start producing it for themselves. The race was on to establish their own coffee plantations in their respective colonies. It was the Netherlands who took an early lead in this race. In 1616, Dutch spies successfully managed to smuggle a coffee plant out of Mocha (Yemen). Although, to begin with, they were only involved …

The History of Calendars

Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas on January 7. Their “old new year” is a week later, on January 14. It is all Julius Caesar’s fault … The Romans sometimes neglected to introduce an extra month every two years to amortize the difference between their lunar calendar and the natural solar year. Julius Caesar decreed that the year 46 BC should have 445 days (some historians implausibly say: 443 days) in order to bridge the yawning discrepancy that accumulated over the preceding seven centuries. It was aptly titled the “Year of Confusion”. To “reset” the calendar, Julius Caesar affixed the New Year on January 1 (the day the Senate traditionally convened) and added a day or two to a few months. He …