Extreme weather has damaged nearly half Australia’s marine ecosystems since 2011

CSIRO says dramatic climate events are compounding the effects of underlying global heating Extreme climate events such as heatwaves, floods and drought damaged 45% of the marine ecosystems along Australias coast in a seven-year period, CSIRO research shows. More than 8,000km of Australias coast was affected by extreme climate events from 2011 to 2017, and in some cases they caused irreversible changes to marine habitats. The 2011 marine heatwave in Western Australia, cyclone Yasi, the mangrove dieback in the Gulf of Carpentaria in 2015-16. They also examined what the longer term repercussions of these events could be, given some areas had shown little, if any, sign of recovery. Some of our models showed it can take 15 years to recover …

Which is the most hayfever-prone city and is ‘botanical sexism’ to blame?

Allergy sufferers from Tokyo to London are struggling as pollen levels surge in cities, possibly due to a preference for male trees In 2016, Melbourne experienced a rare and extreme case of thunderstorm asthma that led to ten deaths and 8,500 people being abundant allergenic pollen. Some are dioecious plants, which have their own distinct sex, and some are monoecious plants (those with male and female flowers on the same plant) that have been cloned to be male. The last few times I was in London, for example, almost every single willow tree I saw was now a male clone; almost all of the bay trees being sold and planted were males; virtually all of the many species of poplar …

Don’t give up! How to stay healthy, happy and combative in impossible political times

Walk the dog, let go with a cry, head to the gym or have sex. Leading campaigners on how to look after yourself before heading back into the fray Every week it seems there is something new to protest about. If we are now in environmentalist and authorTry to spend a little time outdoors, whether it is in a city park or out in the woods or mountains. One of the things we are fighting for is a world where nature still has some place and so its good to get out and remind ourselves of that. I try to get outside every day, just for a few minutes. If I can just see the sky, thats good; sometimes I …

Carmageddon: its killing urban life. We must reclaim our cities before its too late | George Monbiot

Land Rovers latest ads tell us that gas guzzlers contribute to urban culture. They do the opposite, says Guardian columnist George Monbiot What is the best way of wrecking a city? Pour cars into it. Heavy traffic, they use 60%. The car eats the public space that could otherwise become parks, cycle lanes, markets and playgrounds. Land Rovers new advertisements for its marketed as the Range Rover for the city, which sounds like a contradiction: SUVs like this were originally designed for dirt roads in the countryside. But now, according to the agency behind this revolting campaign, we are features the supermodel Adwoa Aboah driving through Brixton, staring at the interesting street life as if on a human safari and …

Climate crisis: aviation industry hears clamour for electric planes

Shift from fossil fuels top of agenda for Paris air show, industry having lagged behind other sectors Faced with growing calls for action on the climate crisis, aerospace companies gathering for the Paris air show next week are turning their thoughts to a future run on electricity rather than fossil fuels. The scale of the challenge is considerable. The target for net zero carbon emissions by 2050, recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and emissions laggard compared with the car industry or power generation, but improvements in the German startup Lilium and US firm Bell Helicopter small hybrid-electric commuter aircraft to market in the early 2020s, and Aurora Flight Sciences, which is also targeting air taxis. Yet for …

Man makes deepest-ever dive in Mariana Trench and discovers … litter

A retired naval officer dove in a submarine nearly 36,000ft into the deepest place on Earth, only to find what appears to be plastic On the deepest dive ever made by a human inside a submarine, a Texas investor found something he could have found in the gutter of nearly any street in the world: litter. Victor Vescovo, a retired naval officer, made the unsettling discovery as he descended nearly 35,853ft (10,927 meters) to a point in the Pacific Oceans Mariana Trench that is the deepest place on Earth, his expedition said in a statement on Monday. His dive went 52ft (16 meters) lower than the previous deepest descent in the trench in 1960. Undersea explorer Victor Vescovo pilots the …